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xml:lang="en" lang="en" dir="ltr"> Chapter 58: 570-574 - Thomas Pynchon Wiki | Mason & Dixon

Chapter 58: 570-574

Page 570

Zachariah Hood
Native of Maryland, and merchant in Annapolis, was the stamp distributor for the Maryland province when the Stamp Act was put into force by the British.

Fort George
See page 566.

Sons of Liberty
See page 564.

Page 571

College of William and Mary
See page 455.

Tuscarora Chiefs
The Tuscarora ("hemp gatherers") are a Native American people with members in New York, Canada, and North Carolina. The Tuscarora emigrated from the region now known as Western New York to the region now known as Eastern Carolina prior to the arrival of Europeans in North America. They had their first encounter with Europeans in North Carolina and Virginia. After 18th century wars, most of the Tuscarora left North Carolina and aligned with the Iroquois in New York, especially their sponsors, the Oneida. But a significant minority remained in North Carolina without a formal government or reservation land. From WIKI

Senecas
The Seneca are a group of indigenous people native to North America. They were the nation located farthest to the west within the Six Nations or Iroquois League in New York before the American Revolution. While exact population figures are unknown, approximately 15,000 to 25,000 Seneca live in Canada, near Brantford, Ontario. They are descendants of Seneca who were resettled there as allies of the British after the American Revolution. Nearly 30,000 Seneca live in the United States, on and off reservations around Buffalo, New York and in Oklahoma. From WIKI

Six Nations
See page 513.

Page 572

Paxton Massacres
See page 305.

Mohawks
See page 531.

Col Washington
See page 273.

Raleigh's
See page 395.

Georgie Rex
See page 367.

Ulster Scots
See page 277.

Theodolite
A theodolite is an instrument for measuring both horizontal and vertical angles, as used in triangulation networks. It is a key tool in surveying and engineering work, particularly on inaccessible ground, but theodolites have been adapted for other specialized purposes in fields like meteorology and rocket launch technology. A modern theodolite consists of a movable telescope mounted within two perpendicular axes—the horizontal or trunnion axis, and the vertical axis. When the telescope is pointed at a desired object, the angle of each of these axes can be measured with great precision, typically on the scale of arcseconds. From WIKI

Gershom
See page 276.

Page 573

The Rabbit in the Moon
The Moon rabbit, also called the Jade Rabbit, is a rabbit that lives on the moon in East Asian folklore. The legends about the moon rabbit are based on the traditional pareidolia that identifies the markings of the moon as a rabbit pounding in a mortar. In Chinese folklore, it is often portrayed as a companion of the moon goddess Chang'e, constantly pounding the elixir of life for her; but in Japanese and Korean versions it is just pounding mochi. From WIKI

Room-Brume
Room-Fog

Camp-Factotum
See page 455.

Captain Zhang
See page 530.

Page 574

Hipparchus
Hipparchus or Hipparch (Greek: Ἵππαρχος, Hipparkhos; c. 190 BC – c. 120 BC) was a Greek astronomer, geographer, and mathematician of the Hellenistic period. From WIKI

Eratosthenes
Eratosthenes of Cyrene (Greek Ἐρατοσθένης; c. 276 BC – c. 195 BC) was a Greek mathematician, elegiac poet, athlete, geographer, and astronomer. He made several discoveries and inventions including a system of latitude and longitude. He was the first Greek to calculate the circumference of the Earth (with remarkable accuracy), and the tilt of the earth's axis (also with remarkable accuracy); he may also have accurately calculated the distance from the earth to the sun and invented the leap day. He also created a map of the world based on the available geographical knowledge of the era. Eratosthenes was also the founder of scientific chronology; he endeavored to fix the dates of the chief literary and political events from the conquest of Troy. From WIKI

Annotations Index

One:
Latitudes and Departures

1: 5-11, 2: 12-13, 3: 14-29, 4: 30-41, 5: 42-46, 6: 47-57, 7: 58-76, 8: 77-86, 9: 87-93, 10: 94-104, 11: 105-115, 12: 116-124, 13: 125-145, 14: 146-157, 15: 158-166, 16: 167-174, 17: 175-182, 18: 183-189, 19: 190-198, 20: 199-206, 21: 207-214, 22: 215-227, 23: 228-237, 24: 238-245, 25: 245-253


Two:
America

26: 257-265, 27: 266-274, 28: 275-288, 29: 289-295, 30: 296-301, 31: 302-314, 32: 315-326, 33: 327-340, 34: 341-348, 35: 349-361, 36: 362-370, 37: 371-381, 38: 382-390, 39: 391-398, 40: 399-409, 41: 410-421, 42: 422-435, 43: 436-439, 44: 440-447, 45: 448-451, 46: 452-459, 47: 460-465, 48: 466-475, 49: 476-483, 50: 484-490, 51: 491-498, 52: 499-510, 53: 511-524, 54: 525-541, 55: 542-553, 56: 554-561, 57: 562-569, 58: 570-574, 59: 575-584, 60: 585-596, 61: 597-607, 62: 608-617, 63: 618-622, 64: 623-628, 65: 629-632, 66: 633-645, 67: 646-657, 68: 658-664, 69: 665-677, 70: 678-686, 71: 687-693, 72: 694-705, 73: 706-713

Three:
Last Transit

74: 717-732, 75: 733-743, 76: 744-748, 77: 749-757, 78: 758-773

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